Time for sharp competitive intelligence

Posts tagged ‘intellectual property’

Patent Lawsuit a Safe Route to Revenue Generation During Recession

The objective and target of any organization is growth at 45 degree on x & Y axis through best products, best services etc… with latest innovations. Ever since recession has hit the western market the economy and jobs are melting like never before, chapter 11 filing cases are increasing. After all to run an organization revenue has to be generated. As newspapers across North America and the globe continue to flood with stories of economic downturn and businesses fighting to survive, organizations this month are placing a renewed focus on innovation and revenue generation.

Revenue generation through patent lawsuits is the new trend. 35 patent lawsuits have been filed just in 5 plus month time during 2009, wonder how many more are there. Surely first half of 2009 is not good for Google in terms of lawsuits, total 14 lawsuit are been battled.

Lawsuit filing cases of 2009:

  1. Aloft Media, LLC v. Yahoo! Inc. et al
  2. Performance Pricing, Inc. v. Google Inc. et al
  3. Leader Technologies Inc. v. Facebook Inc.
  4. Actus, LLC v. Bank of America Corp. et al
  5. Paid Search Engine Tools, LLC v. Google, Inc. et al
  6. ESN LLC v. Cisco Systems, Inc. et al
  7. Heartland Recreational Vehicles LLC v. Forest River Inc
  8. Software Rights Archive, LLC v. Google Inc. et al
  9. Northeastern University et al v. Google, Inc.,
  10. Polaris IP, LLC v. Google Inc. et al
  11. Function Media, L.L.C. v. Google, Inc. et al
  12. Aloft Media, LLC v. Google, Inc.
  13. GraphOn Corporation v. Google Inc.
  14. Google, Inc. v. EMSAT Advanced Geo-Location Technology, LLC et al
  15. Picsel (Research) Ltd. et al v. Apple Inc.
  16. Web Tracking Solutions, Inc. et al v. Google, Inc.
  17. Association For Molecular Pathology et al v. United States Patent and Trademark Office et al
  18. Cygnus Systems, Inc. v. Microsoft Corporation, et al
  19. Google Inc. et al v. Egger et al
  20. Certicom Corporation et al v. Sony Corporation et al
  21. Klausner Technologies Inc v. Verizon Wireless et al
  22. Clark v. The Walt Disney Company et al
  23. HYPERPHRASE TECHNOLOGIES, LLC v. GOOGLE INC.
  24. BabyAge..com, Inc. v. Leachco, Inc.
  25. IP Innovation LLC et al v. Google, Inc.
  26. Elan Microelectronics Corporation v. Apple, Inc.
  27. Bid for Position, LLC v. AOL, LLC et al
  28. Soilworks LLC v Midwest Industrial Supply Inc
  29. Priest et al v Google Inc.
  30. 21 srl v. Apple Inc. et al
  31. PACid Group, LLC v. Apple Inc. et al
  32. Accolade Systems LLC v. Micron Technology Inc et al
  33. Affinity Labs of Texas, LLC v. Apple, Inc.
  34. Clear With Computers, LLC v. Bassett Furniture Industries, Inc. et al
  35. Motorola Inc v. Research In Motion Limited et al

Lawsuit Claim: Students’ Lecture Notes Infringe on Professor’s Copyright

University of Florida professor Michael Moulton thinks copyright law protects the lectures he gives to his students, and he’s headed to court to prove it.

Moulton and his e-textbook publisher are suing Thomas Bean, who runs a company that repackages and sells student notes, arguing that the business is illegal since notes taken during college lectures violate the professor’s copyright.

Faulkner Press filed suit in a Florida court Tuesday against the the owner of Einstein’s Notes, which sells “study kits” for classes, including Professor Michael Moulton’s course on “Wildlife Issues in the New Millennium.”

Those notes are illegal, Faulkner and Moulton contend, since they are derivative works of the professor’s copyrighted lectures.

If successful, the suit (.pdf) could put an end to a lucrative, but ethically murky businesses that have grown up around large universities to profit from students who don’t always want to go to the classes they are paying for.

The suit could also have ramifications for more longstanding businesses such as Cliffs Notes, which summarize copyrighted novels.

Faulkner Press publishes two e-textbooks that Moulton wrote and uses in his classes, and sells its own set of class notes for the course.

But James Sullivan, Faulkner Press’ attorney, says the suit isn’t about money for the professors, it’s about protecting its intellectual property.

Tag Cloud