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Posts tagged ‘Apple’

Patent Lawsuit a Safe Route to Revenue Generation During Recession

The objective and target of any organization is growth at 45 degree on x & Y axis through best products, best services etc… with latest innovations. Ever since recession has hit the western market the economy and jobs are melting like never before, chapter 11 filing cases are increasing. After all to run an organization revenue has to be generated. As newspapers across North America and the globe continue to flood with stories of economic downturn and businesses fighting to survive, organizations this month are placing a renewed focus on innovation and revenue generation.

Revenue generation through patent lawsuits is the new trend. 35 patent lawsuits have been filed just in 5 plus month time during 2009, wonder how many more are there. Surely first half of 2009 is not good for Google in terms of lawsuits, total 14 lawsuit are been battled.

Lawsuit filing cases of 2009:

  1. Aloft Media, LLC v. Yahoo! Inc. et al
  2. Performance Pricing, Inc. v. Google Inc. et al
  3. Leader Technologies Inc. v. Facebook Inc.
  4. Actus, LLC v. Bank of America Corp. et al
  5. Paid Search Engine Tools, LLC v. Google, Inc. et al
  6. ESN LLC v. Cisco Systems, Inc. et al
  7. Heartland Recreational Vehicles LLC v. Forest River Inc
  8. Software Rights Archive, LLC v. Google Inc. et al
  9. Northeastern University et al v. Google, Inc.,
  10. Polaris IP, LLC v. Google Inc. et al
  11. Function Media, L.L.C. v. Google, Inc. et al
  12. Aloft Media, LLC v. Google, Inc.
  13. GraphOn Corporation v. Google Inc.
  14. Google, Inc. v. EMSAT Advanced Geo-Location Technology, LLC et al
  15. Picsel (Research) Ltd. et al v. Apple Inc.
  16. Web Tracking Solutions, Inc. et al v. Google, Inc.
  17. Association For Molecular Pathology et al v. United States Patent and Trademark Office et al
  18. Cygnus Systems, Inc. v. Microsoft Corporation, et al
  19. Google Inc. et al v. Egger et al
  20. Certicom Corporation et al v. Sony Corporation et al
  21. Klausner Technologies Inc v. Verizon Wireless et al
  22. Clark v. The Walt Disney Company et al
  23. HYPERPHRASE TECHNOLOGIES, LLC v. GOOGLE INC.
  24. BabyAge..com, Inc. v. Leachco, Inc.
  25. IP Innovation LLC et al v. Google, Inc.
  26. Elan Microelectronics Corporation v. Apple, Inc.
  27. Bid for Position, LLC v. AOL, LLC et al
  28. Soilworks LLC v Midwest Industrial Supply Inc
  29. Priest et al v Google Inc.
  30. 21 srl v. Apple Inc. et al
  31. PACid Group, LLC v. Apple Inc. et al
  32. Accolade Systems LLC v. Micron Technology Inc et al
  33. Affinity Labs of Texas, LLC v. Apple, Inc.
  34. Clear With Computers, LLC v. Bassett Furniture Industries, Inc. et al
  35. Motorola Inc v. Research In Motion Limited et al
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Apple Settles iPod Patent with Burst

Apple agreed to settle a patent dispute with Burst.com, ending two years of litigation. Burst agreed not to sue Apple over current or pending DVR patents.

Under the agreement, Apple will pay Burst.com $10 million and get access to Burst.com’s patent portfolio, with some exceptions. Apple won’t have access to four of Burst.com’s current and pending patents, including three pending patents relating to digital video recorder (DVR) technology. Court costs, expenses and attorney’s fees will reduce the proceeds to Burst.com to $4.6 million.

Burst alleges that Apple infringed four patents for transmission of compressed audio and video files in iTunes, iLife, QuickTime and the iPod.

Apple was asked by Burst in 2004 to license some of its patents, saying they were at the pioneering heart of the iPod. In January 2006, Apple sued Burst.com in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, seeking a judgment that the Burst.com patents were invalid and not infringed upon. Burst.com countersued in April 2006, alleging that Apple infringed four of its patents.

Bust also won a $60 million financial settlement from Microsoft in 2005 after a patent dispute over the transmission of music and video with its Windows Media Player.

Another Apple Lawsuit

Apple Inc. is being sued by Klausner Technologies that has claimed that Apple iPhone has infringed on the Klausner patent for visual voice mail. Klausner is seeking $360 million in compensation and damages for its patent numbers US5572576 and US5283818 which basically describe a system that allows for the visual retrieval and sorting of voice mail by way of a display.

Patent #: US5572576
Title: Telephone answering device linking displayed data with recorded audio message
Assignee: Klausner Patent Technologies
Filind Date: March 15, 1994
Abstract: A telephone answering device (TAD) which includes a means of intelligently organizing voice messages, associated entered codes such as personal IDs and home telephone numbers, and information stored in the memory of the TAD. These codes or numbers are decoded by means of the caller entering DTMF signals into the telephone which are recognized, recorded and processed by the TAD. When processed with codes and personal information previously entered into the device’s memory, the TAD displays the identity of the callers for each message, thus providing a menu of choices, i.e., a list of callers. This enables the user to access messages in a selective manner based on the identity of the caller. The need to listen to the actual voice messages to determine the caller’s identity and the need to listen to the messages sequentially or chronologically is obviated, saving both time and effort. Additionally, because the voice message is also linked to pre-stored additional data in the data base, when hearing a message, one also can view relevant associated information, such as a fax number, etc., that might not have been left in the audio message but might be important. A remote access device is also provided that allows the user to retrieve and display the callers’ identities and select a message to be played back from a remote location.

Patent #: US5283818
Title: Telephone answering device linking displayed data with recorded audio message
Assignee: Klausner Patent Technologies
Filind Date: March 31, 1992
Abstract: A telephone answering device (TAD) which includes a means of intelligently organizing voice messages, associated entered codes such as personal IDs and home telephone numbers, and information stored in the memory of the TAD. These codes or numbers are decoded by means of the caller entering DTMF signals into the telephone which are recognized, recorded and processed by the TAD. When processed with codes and personal information previously entered into the device’s memory, the TAD displays the identity of the callers for each message, thus providing a menu of choices, i.e., a list of callers. This enables the user to access messages in a selective manner based on the identity of the caller. The need to listen to the actual voice messages to determine the caller’s identity and the need to listen to the messages sequentially or chronologically is obviated, saving both time and effort. Additionally, because the voice message is also linked to pre-stored additional data in the data base, when hearing a message, one also can view relevant associated information, such as a fax number, etc., that might not have been left in the audio message but might be important.

There are several other companies that have paid Klausner to license these technologies mentioned in these patents including AOL which is featuring the technology in its AOL Voicemail service. Vonage also pays for the use of this technology for its Voicemail Plus service. Thus far, Apple and AT&T have not made any comment on this issue.

Klausner is also filing against Comcast for their Digital Voice Mail, Cablevision for its Systems’ Optimum Voicemail, and Ebay’s Skype. The second suit filed in a different court on the same day seeks $300 in damages for patent infringement. Klausner Technologies is an avid patent seeker and was founded by Judah Klausner who invented and patented the PDA and electronic organizer. Klausner has been well known for its aggressive patent mongering.

Instant Messaging Functionality for iPhone, Apple patent

A recent patent filing titled “Portable Electronic Device for Instant Messaging ” indicates that Apple is getting closer to adding its own instant messaging client to the iPhone.

The filing (US Patent 20080055269) covers methods for sending, receiving, and viewing ongoing conversations. The proposed GUI is similar to Apple’s current interface for SMS.

The application reads: “The GUI has a set of messages exchanged between a user of the device and another person. The set of messages (is) displayed in a chronological order. In response to detecting a scrolling gesture comprising a substantially vertical movement of a user contact with the touch-screen display, the display of messages (is) scrolled in accordance with a direction of the scrolling gesture.”

The application does mention SMS, but there are serveral references to “IM” and “Instant Messaging”. The patent application provides background on Instant Messaging.

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